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Procedures & Injections

We specialise and BULK-BILL the following procedures:

1) Image Guided Biopsies
2) Image Guided Core-Biopsies
3) Spinal Injections
4) Musculoskeletal Injections

To find out more on a specific procedure, click on the relevant FAQ's below.

Available Locations

Moorebank

Moorebank Shopping Village
Shop 14C, 42 Stockton Avenue
Moorebank NSW 2170
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Campbelltown

Building B, Suites 5-9
4 Hyde Parade
Campbelltown
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Liverpool

Ground Floor
51 Goulburn St
Liverpool NSW 2170
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Minto

North Entrance Car Park
Shop 2A - Minto Mall, 10 Brookfield Road
Minto, NSW, 2566
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FAQs

These are a broad range of injections that are used to predominantly treat pain.
These injections are performed using imaging guidance, from CT or Ultrasound, so that a needle may be placed either into a joint, or the surrounding soft tissues, such as tendons, muscles or bursae.
The injection we use is a mixture of local anesthetic and steroid. Local anesthetics numb the area, giving short-term pain relief. The steroids have a long-term effect by reducing swelling (inflammation).
Shortly before your procedure you will be required to change into a gown.
Before commencing the procedure, the Radiologist will explain the procedure.
He will then ask you to sign a consent form.

Depending on the area to be injected, you will either lie down or sit up, and the Radiologist will use either CT or Ultrasound to guide the injection. The effected area will be cleaned with antiseptic solution and covered with a sterile drape. After viewing the affected area, the Doctor will inject local anesthetic into your skin to numb the area. This may sting momentarily. After the skin has been anesthetized a small needle will be used to inject the steroid, there may be some discomfort at the time of injection.

After the procedure a small dressing will be applied to the site of injection, which can be removed in 4 hours.

Do not drive, operate machinery or drink alcohol for 24hours following your injection.

Pain relief from the injection may not become noticeable until a few days or up to a week after the injection. Some patients experience relief for only one or two weeks while others may have good relief for many months.
CT guided injections deliver medications directly into the area of the spine that is the source of the pain, usually giving much better pain relief than oral tablets.
The injection we use is a mixture of local anesthetic and steroid. Local anesthetics numb the area, giving short-term pain relief. The steroids have a long-term effect by reducing swelling (inflammation).
Shortly before your procedure you will be required to change into a gown. Before commencing the procedure, the Radiologist will explain the procedure. He will then ask you to sign a consent form.

You will lie either on your stomach or your side depending on the area to be injected. At this point it is important to do your best not to move. A CT scan will be done to localise the area. Your back will be cleaned with antiseptic solution and covered with a sterile drape.

After viewing the bones in your back using the CT scanner the Doctor will inject local anesthetic into your skin to numb the area. This may sting momentarily.

After the skin has been anesthetized a small needle will be directed into the area to be injected. When the needle is in the correct position the Doctor will inject the steroid. There may be some discomfort in the back at the time of injection. After the procedure a small dressing will be applied to the site of injection, which can be removed in 4 hours.

Do not drive, operate machinery or drink alcohol for 4 hours following your injection.

You may experience some temporary numbness at the injection site and down your legs.

Most patients experience pain relief immediately after the procedure because of the anesthetic used. This will usually wear off within 8 hours, and the pain may return again. The steroid normally takes between 2-5 days to take effect and start working.
A common cause of pain is an inflammatory response to nerve irritation by a disc protrusion or nerve entrapment. An injection of steroids into the epidural space, the space surrounding the spinal sac, can act to decrease this inflammation, thus decreasing the pain.
This is the injection of steroids and local anaesthetic into the perineural space around the nerves in your back. Lumbar perineural injections are done to relieve lower leg pain and cervical perineural injections are done to relieve arm and neck pain.
Facet joints are located on either side of the vertebrae. Injections into them treat lower back pain caused by inflammation that occurs in this joint and from joint degeneration.
A thin needle is used to remove some cells from a lesion or area in question. These cells are sent to be viewed by a pathologist under the microscope. This may help your Doctor diagnose your condition.
Shortly before your procedure you will be required to change into a gown.

Before commencing the procedure, the Radiologist (Doctor) will explain the procedure, and any further questions you may have about the information on this sheet. He will then ask you to sign a consent form.

For CT guided biopsies, you will be placed on the CT scanner, and a short, low dose scan targeting the area required would be performed. This is used to locate the lesion and plan the biopsy. For lesions visible under ultrasound, the ultrasound machine is used to locate the lesion.

The Doctor will then inject local anesthetic into your skin to numb the area.

The Doctor will be able to guide the needle into the exact location of the lesion using the CT scanner/Ultrasound machine, which is shown on a video screen.

Samples are usually taken 3-4 times to ensure as many cells as possible are available for the Pathologist to view.

At the end of the test, the needle is removed. After the procedure a small dressing will be applied to the site of injection, which can be removed in 4 hours.

Occasionally, pain is experienced several hours after the procedure. Simple pain relief medication is recommended to treat this pain.

You should have someone to drive you home following this procedure.

Some biopsies require a period of observation following the procedure and you will be at the practice for at leats an hour following the biopsy.
We routinely ask all our patients whether they are using any medication (ie: anti-inflammatory, anti-coagulants etc) that may increase the risk of the radiology procedure. It is the company policy however that all our patients discuss this with their GPs and/or Physicians prior to formally ceasing their medication.

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